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dc.contributor.authorTurner, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorWebb, OJ
dc.contributor.authorCotton, Debby
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-04T09:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-10
dc.identifier.issn0309-877X
dc.identifier.issn1469-9486
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/16919
dc.description18 month embargo.
dc.description.abstract

Traditionally, undergraduates study several ‘long thin’ modules at the same time. Under ‘immersive scheduling’, students complete a ‘short fat’ module (i.e. a single subject studied over a compressed period), before moving onto other modules. This piece of social research capitalised on the introduction of immersive scheduling to the first year of all undergraduate programmes at one UK University. Both semesters began with a short fat module, before students switched to studying long thin modules simultaneously. A novel ‘within-subjects’ analysis compared how individuals (N > 3000) performed in immersively-delivered modules versus traditional modules. Overall, marks on immersively-delivered modules were significantly higher, with this pattern replicated across semesters and in various demographic subgroups. This real-world evaluation complements existing ‘between-subjects’ studies, where an identical module is delivered in immersive and traditional formats to separate cohorts. It offers further indications that immersive scheduling may be a beneficial pedagogic tool for enhancing student attainment.

dc.format.extent1371-1384
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
dc.titleIntroducing immersive scheduling in a UK university: Potential implications for student attainment
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue10
plymouth.volume45
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalJournal of Further and Higher Education
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0309877X.2021.1873252
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PS - Library and Educational Development
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA23 Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-12-28
dc.rights.embargodate2022-8-10
dc.identifier.eissn1469-9486
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/0309877X.2021.1873252
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-02-10
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.funderInstitutional Accreditation Impact Evaluation::Advance HE


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