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dc.contributor.authorLynch, TJen
dc.contributor.editorGilbert,, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-23T19:57:05Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-09T04:37:56Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-09T04:39:07Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-09T04:49:16Z
dc.date.available2015-12-23T19:57:05Z
dc.date.available2016-10-09T04:37:56Z
dc.date.available2016-10-09T04:39:07Z
dc.date.available2016-10-09T04:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-31en
dc.identifier.issn2152-7857en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/6309
dc.description.abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore a community swimming program using autoethnography qualitative research. Autoethnography is an approach to research and writing that seeks to describe and systematically analyze (graphy) personal experience (auto) in order to understand cultural experience (ethno) (Ellis 2004; Holman Jones 2005). Through childhood reflection of lived swimming experiences, and adult life reflection of lived swimming teaching experiences as a primary school teacher, health and physical education (HPE) specialist teacher and teacher educator, the author, illustrates how aquatic practices and education has shaped his belief, and consequently his drive to initiate a community swimming program. Furthermore, through this illustration, the reader is invited to enter the world of the author as a program pioneer, and share examination of dynamics involved in initiating opportunities for collaboratively developing swimming ability and confidence in primary school children, pre-service teachers and classroom teachers. More specifically, this involves critical analysis of course preparation, participant benefits and barriers during a collaborative swimming education process within Australian society.

en
dc.description.sponsorshipCommon Ground Publishingen
dc.format.extent197 - 207 (11)en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.publisherThe Sport Collection, CG Publisheren
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3982
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/3982
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/6300
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/6300
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/6301
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/6301
dc.subjectCollaborationen
dc.subjectSwimming,en
dc.subjectWater Safety,en
dc.subjectHealth and Physical Education,en
dc.titleSwimming education in Australian society.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttp://media.wix.com/ugd/842c5e_cfdc4d5be98245c5a90837a72b879557.pdfen
plymouth.edition1en
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume4en
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://ijr.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.191/prod.184en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalThe International Journal of Sport and Societyen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts & Humanities
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts & Humanities/Plymouth Institute of Education
dc.publisher.placeChampaign, Illinois, USAen
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-11-02en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-01-31en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
plymouth.oa-locationhttp://media.wix.com/ugd/842c5e_cfdc4d5be98245c5a90837a72b879557.pdfen


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