Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChalder, Men
dc.contributor.authorWiles, NJen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHollinghurst, SPen
dc.contributor.authorHaase, AMen
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, AHen
dc.contributor.authorFox, KRen
dc.contributor.authorCostelloe, Cen
dc.contributor.authorSearle, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBaxter, Hen
dc.contributor.authorWinder, Ren
dc.contributor.authorWright, Cen
dc.contributor.authorTurner, KMen
dc.contributor.authorCalnan, Men
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, DAen
dc.contributor.authorPeters, TJen
dc.contributor.authorSharp, DJen
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, AAen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Gen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-11T09:43:12Z
dc.date.available2016-02-11T09:43:12Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-06en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4308
dc.description.abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of facilitated physical activity as an adjunctive treatment for adults with depression presenting in primary care. DESIGN: Pragmatic, multicentre, two arm parallel randomised controlled trial. SETTING: General practices in Bristol and Exeter. PARTICIPANTS: 361 adults aged 18-69 who had recently consulted their general practitioner with symptoms of depression. All those randomised had a diagnosis of an episode of depression as assessed by the clinical interview schedule-revised and a Beck depression inventory score of 14 or more. INTERVENTIONS: In addition to usual care, intervention participants were offered up to three face to face sessions and 10 telephone calls with a trained physical activity facilitator over eight months. The intervention was based on theory and aimed to provide individually tailored support and encouragement to engage in physical activity. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was self reported symptoms of depression, assessed with the Beck depression inventory at four months post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes included use of antidepressants and physical activity at the four, eight, and 12 month follow-up points, and symptoms of depression at eight and 12 month follow-up. RESULTS: There was no evidence that participants offered the physical activity intervention reported improvement in mood by the four month follow-up point compared with those in the usual care group; adjusted between group difference in mean Beck depression inventory score -0.54 (95% confidence interval -3.06 to 1.99; P=0.68). Similarly, there was no evidence that the intervention group reported a change in mood by the eight and 12 month follow-up points. Nor was there evidence that the intervention reduced antidepressant use compared with usual care (adjusted odds ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 2.06; P=0.44) over the duration of the trial. However, participants allocated to the intervention group reported more physical activity during the follow-up period than those allocated to the usual care group (adjusted odds ratio 2.27, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 3.89; P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS: The addition of a facilitated physical activity intervention to usual care did not improve depression outcome or reduce use of antidepressants compared with usual care alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN16900744.

en
dc.format.extente2758 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAntidepressive Agentsen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.subjectExercise Therapyen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPrimary Health Careen
dc.subjectPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen
dc.subjectRegression Analysisen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleFacilitated physical activity as a treatment for depressed adults: randomised controlled trial.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22674921en
plymouth.volume344en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalBMJen
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.e2758en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/Peninsula Medical School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)/CCT&PS
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1756-1833en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmj.e2758en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV