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dc.contributor.authorBerry, LMen
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMay, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-18T15:34:36Z
dc.date.available2012-05-18T15:34:36Z
dc.date.issued2007-06-01en
dc.identifier.issn0269-9931en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/998
dc.description.abstract

The elaborated intrusion model (Kavanagh, Andrade, & May, 2005) argues that a craving episode begins with a desire-related intrusive thought. This study tests the assumption that such intrusive thoughts, during hunger, reflect an increase in accessibility of food-related information in memory. Fifty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to hungry or satiated conditions. Hunger was manipulated by asking the "hungry" group to abstain from eating breakfast and snacks prior to testing before lunch, while the "satiated" group was asked to eat normally and attend testing after lunch. Participants completed a lexical decision task containing food-related and neutral words, an intrusive thoughts questionnaire and a hunger questionnaire. Priming for food-related items relative to neutral on the lexical decision task was higher for hungry participants than satiated participants. Priming correlated strongly with frequency of food-related intrusive thoughts during the task. We conclude that desire-related lexical decision priming could provide a useful objective correlate of proneness to desire-related intrusions.

en
dc.format.extent865 - 878en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleHunger-related intrusive thoughts reflect increased accessibility of food itemsen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue4en
plymouth.volume21en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalCognition and Emotionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02699930600826408en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2020
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2020/UoA04 Test
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dc.identifier.eissn1464-0600en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/02699930600826408en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2007-06-01en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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