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dc.contributor.authorZhuang, H
dc.contributor.authorAli, K
dc.contributor.authorArdu, S
dc.contributor.authorTredwin, C
dc.contributor.authorHu, B
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-15T07:45:35Z
dc.date.available2016-04-15T07:45:35Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-14
dc.identifier.issn2041-4889
dc.identifier.issn2041-4889
dc.identifier.otherARTN e2192
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4504
dc.description.abstract

Tooth development and stem cells Tooth is an essential organ in humans. Tooth development spans from the embryonic to the adolescent stage and can last for more than 10 years, which represents possibly the longest duration among all the human organs.1 The whole tooth development process ranges from the initial oral epithelium thickening to root formation and eruption.1 Early tooth development results in rapid cell proliferation to provide sufficient cell number for populating the organ. The key events during later developments are involved in the differentiation of 'tooth-specific' cells such as ameloblasts, the epithelial origin cells that produce enamel, and odontoblasts, the mesenchymal origin cells that produce dentine. The long time duration associated with the development and maturation of teeth, followed by their continuous exposure to a complex oral cavity environment, makes the teeth vulnerable to genetic, intrinsic and extrinsic influences. The consequences include failures and defects of tooth development, such as tooth agenesis, as well as being prone to trauma and diseases such as dental caries and periodontitis. Tooth tissues have no (e.g. enamel) or very limited (e.g. dentine) regeneration capability because upon development completion only a limited number of stem cells persist in the mesenchyme (e.g. pulp and periodontal ligaments) and the epithelium disappears completely. However, increasing evidence has shown that stem cells are indeed important for tooth development and regeneration, as, besides chondrocytes and osteoblasts, tooth pulp cells have been recently shown to be able to trans-differentiate into other cell types such as neuron-like cells. Therefore, maintenance of a healthy tooth is not only important for a fully functional digestive system, but also essential to preserve an important cell source for regenerative medicine and stem cell therapies.

dc.format.extente2192-e2192
dc.format.mediumElectronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectAging
dc.subjectAnesthetics
dc.subjectAutophagy
dc.subjectBacterial Physiological Phenomena
dc.subjectCell Differentiation
dc.subjectFluorides
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectOdontoblasts
dc.subjectPeriodontitis
dc.subjectTooth
dc.titleAutophagy in dental tissues: a double-edged sword
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeEditorial Material
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27077808
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume7
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/cddis.2016.103
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalCell death and disease
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/cddis.2016.103
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/Peninsula Dental School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Translational and Stratified Medicine (ITSMED)/CBR
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-03-31
dc.identifier.eissn2041-4889
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/cddis.2016.103
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-04-14
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.funderRole of the FoxN1 gene as a central regulator of epidermal planar cell polarity signaling expression and function::BBSRC


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