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dc.contributor.authorWyer, NAen
dc.contributor.authorHollins, TJen
dc.contributor.authorPahl, Sen
dc.contributor.authorRoper, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T14:31:51Z
dc.date.available2015-12-09T14:31:51Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3891
dc.description.abstract

Three experiments investigated the influence of level of construal (i.e., the interpretation of actions in terms of their meaning or their details) on different stages of face memory. We employed a standard multiple-face recognition paradigm, with half of the faces inverted at test. Construal level was manipulated prior to recognition (Experiment 1), during study (Experiment 2) or both (Experiment 3). The results support a general advantage for high-level construal over low-level construal at both study and at test, and suggest that matching processing style between study and recognition has no advantage. These experiments provide additional evidence in support of a link between semantic processing (i.e., construal) and visual (i.e., face) processing. We conclude with a discussion of implications for current theories relating to both construal and face processing.

en
dc.format.extent1524 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectconfigural processingen
dc.subjectconstrual levelen
dc.subjectface inversion effecten
dc.subjectface recognitionen
dc.titleThe hows and whys of face memory: level of construal influences the recognition of human faces.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26500586en
plymouth.volume6en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalFront Psycholen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01524en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Academics/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 All current users/Professional Services
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health & Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-09-22en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01524en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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