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dc.contributor.authorSkorka-Brown, Jen
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Jen
dc.contributor.authorWhalley, Ben
dc.contributor.authorMay, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-23T08:20:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-24T13:22:56Z
dc.date.available2015-07-23T08:20:03Z
dc.date.available2015-07-24T13:22:56Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-31en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3458
dc.descriptionDesire, cognitive theory, behavioral research,Elaborated Intrusion theory, addiction, technology, multilevel modelsen
dc.description.abstract

Most research on cognitive processes in craving has been carried out in the laboratory and focuses on food craving. This study extends laboratory findings to real world settings and cravings for drugs or activities as well as food. Previous laboratory research has found that playing Tetris reduces craving strength. The present study used an ecological momentary assessment protocol in which 31 undergraduate participants carried iPods for a week and were prompted 7 times each day, by SMS message, to use their iPod to report craving. Participants reported craving target and strength (0- 100), whether they indulged their previous craving (yes/no), and whether they were under the influence of alcohol (yes/no). Those randomly assigned to the intervention condition (n=15) then played Tetris for 3 minutes and reported their craving again. Those in the monitoring-only control condition (n=16) provided baseline craving data to test if Tetris reduced the incidence and strength of spontaneous cravings across the week. Playing Tetris decreased craving strength for drugs (alcohol, nicotine, caffeine), food and drink, and activities (sex, exercise, gaming), with a mean reduction of 13.9 percentage points, effect size f2= 0.11. This effect was consistent across the week. This is the first demonstration that visual cognitive interference can be used in the field to reduce cravings for substances and activities other than eating.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3455
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/3455
dc.titlePlaying Tetris decreases drug and other cravings in real world settingsen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.publication-statusAccepteden
plymouth.journalAddictive Behaviorsen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-07-23en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-31en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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