Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMay, Jen
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, DJen
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-30T09:43:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-30T09:43:28Z
dc.date.available2014-09-30T09:43:03Z
dc.date.available2014-09-30T09:43:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-09-22en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3127
dc.description.abstract

Ten years after the publication of Elaborated Intrusion (EI) Theory, there is now substantial research into its key predictions. The distinction between intrusive thoughts, which are driven by automatic processes, and their elaboration, involving controlled processing, is well established. Desires for both addictive substances and other desired targets are typically marked by imagery, especially when they are intense. Attention training strategies such as body scanning reduce intrusive thoughts, while concurrent tasks that introduce competing sensory information interfere with elaboration, especially if they compete for the same limited-capacity working memory resources. EI Theory has spawned new assessment instruments that are performing strongly and offer the ability to more clearly delineate craving from correlated processes. It has also inspired new approaches to treatment. In particular, training people to use vivid sensory imagery for functional goals holds promise as an intervention for substance misuse, since it is likely to both sustain motivation and moderate craving.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3126
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/3126
dc.subjectCravingen
dc.subjectdesireen
dc.subjectimageryen
dc.subjectaddiction treatmenten
dc.titleThe Elaborated Intrusion Theory of Desire: A 10-year retrospective and implications for addiction treatmentsen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.publication-statusAccepteden
plymouth.journalAddictive Behaviorsen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.09.016en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.09.016en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV