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dc.contributor.authorSood, A
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-28T08:48:58Z
dc.date.available2023-03-28T08:48:58Z
dc.date.issued2023-04-18
dc.identifier.issn1911-0243
dc.identifier.issn1911-0243
dc.identifier.urihttps://pearl.plymouth.ac.uk/handle/10026.1/20639
dc.descriptionFile replaced (incorrect version) on 24.04.23 by NK (LDS)
dc.description.abstract

This article draws on critical Indigenous theories to locate previously marginalized knowledge systems in Mungo Park’s Travels in The Interior Districts of Africa (1799). Park’s text abounds with descriptions of jilla keas, “singing-men,” and other examples of West African literary cultures (written and oral). I argue that an Indigenous-centered method of reading allows us to locate the Mande knowledges that not only informed Park’s mediations of orality but also attempted to resist and reimagine oral culture in the face of increasing colonial presence in West Africa. This article offers possibilities for the critical recovery of Indigenous knowledges within colonial texts. I find a possible reason for Park’s detailed engagement with West African oral cultures by locating Travels within a body of Scottish Romantic writing, highlighting the significance of his friendship with Walter Scott in shaping a strong interest in orality.

dc.format.extent193-213
dc.languageen
dc.publisherUniversity of Toronto Press
dc.subject47 Language, Communication and Culture
dc.subject4705 Literary Studies
dc.title“We were amused by an itinerant singing-man”: Print, Writing, and Orality in Mungo Park’s Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa
dc.typejournal-article
plymouth.issue2
plymouth.volume35
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEighteenth-Century Fiction
dc.identifier.doi10.3138/ecf.35.2.193
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role|Academics
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|REF 2021 Researchers by UoA|UoA27 English Language and Literature
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business|School of Society and Culture
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-06-13
dc.date.updated2023-03-28T08:48:58Z
dc.rights.embargodate2024-4-18
dc.identifier.eissn1911-0243
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3138/ecf.35.2.193


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