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dc.contributor.authorLopez-Persem, A
dc.contributor.authorRoumazeilles, L
dc.contributor.authorFolloni, D
dc.contributor.authorMarche, K
dc.contributor.authorFouragnan, EF
dc.contributor.authorKhalighinejad, N
dc.contributor.authorRushworth, MFS
dc.contributor.authorSallet, J
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-05T12:29:09Z
dc.date.available2021-11-05T12:29:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-10
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.issn1091-6490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/18239
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is a key brain region involved in complex cognitive functions such as reward processing and decision making. Neuroimaging studies have reported unilateral OFC response to reward-related variables; however, those studies rarely discussed this observation. Nevertheless, some lesion studies suggest that the left and right OFC contribute differently to cognitive processes. We hypothesized that the OFC asymmetrical response to reward could reflect underlying hemispherical difference in OFC functional connectivity. Using resting-state and reward-related functional MRI data from humans and from rhesus macaques, we first identified an asymmetrical response of the lateral OFC to reward in both species. Crucially, the subregion showing the highest reward-related asymmetry (RRA) overlapped with the region showing the highest functional connectivity asymmetry (FCA). Furthermore, the two types of asymmetries were found to be significantly correlated across individuals. In both species, the right lateral OFC was more connected to the default mode network compared to the left lateral OFC. Altogether, our results suggest a functional specialization of the left and right lateral OFC in primates.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent28452-28462
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.subjectorbitofrontal cortex
dc.subjectreward
dc.subjectfunctional connectivity
dc.subjectlateralization
dc.titleDifferential functional connectivity underlying asymmetric reward-related activity in human and nonhuman primates
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33122437
plymouth.issue45
plymouth.volume117
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2000759117
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.2000759117
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-09-16
dc.rights.embargodate2021-11-9
dc.identifier.eissn1091-6490
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1073/pnas.2000759117
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2020-11-10
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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