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dc.contributor.authorHudson, Men
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CHen
dc.contributor.authorJellema, Ten
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-20T17:15:51Z
dc.date.available2021-08-20T17:15:51Z
dc.date.issued2009-09en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17638
dc.description.abstract

Using a representational momentum paradigm, this study investigated the hypothesis that judgments of how far another agent's head has rotated are influenced by the perceived gaze direction of the head. Participants observed a video-clip of a face rotating 60 degrees towards them starting from the left or right profile view. The gaze direction of the face was either congruent with, ahead of, or lagging behind the angle of rotation. Following this, two static faces, at varying angles of rotation with respect to the end-point angle of the face in the video-clip, were presented simultaneously. The task of the participants was to decide which of the two heads was at an angle best resembling the angle of the end-point of the moving face. The critical test condition consisted of one test face oriented at 10 degrees before, and the other at 10 degrees after the end-point. The 'lagging behind' gaze condition elicited a significant underestimation of the rotation compared to the 'congruent' and 'ahead' gaze conditions. Participants did not exhibit similar biases when judging the rotation of several non-face control stimuli with visual features that mimicked different aspects of gaze direction. The findings suggest that when the gaze direction of a perceived agent is incongruent with the direction of the agent's head motion observers automatically utilise this discrepancy to adjust their inferences about the agent's intended heading direction.

en
dc.format.extent423 - 434en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subjectAttentionen
dc.subjectFaceen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectFixation, Ocularen
dc.subjectHeaden
dc.subjectHead Movementsen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectJudgmenten
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMotion Perceptionen
dc.subjectOrientationen
dc.subjectPsychomotor Performanceen
dc.subjectReaction Timeen
dc.subjectRotationen
dc.subjectSpace Perceptionen
dc.subjectVisual Perceptionen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titleAnticipating intentional actions: the effect of eye gaze direction on the judgment of head rotation.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19615675en
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume112en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalCognitionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cognition.2009.06.011en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-06-19en
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7838en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.cognition.2009.06.011en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2009-09en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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