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dc.contributor.authorHertwig, R
dc.contributor.authorWoike, JK
dc.contributor.authorSchupp, J
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T19:34:10Z
dc.date.available2021-08-09T19:34:10Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn0882-7974
dc.identifier.issn1939-1498
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17531
dc.description.abstract

People sometimes choose to remain ignorant, even when information comes at low marginal costs and promises high utility. To investigate whether older adults enlist deliberate ignorance more than younger adults, potentially as an emotion-regulation tool, we presented a representative sample of 1,910 residents of Germany with 13 scenarios in which knowledge could result in substantial gains or losses. The strongest correlate of deliberate ignorance was indeed age. Openness to experience was negatively correlated with deliberate ignorance; risk preference did not and neuroticism did not consistently predict it. Findings suggest a possible positivity effect in the decision to access new but ambiguous information. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).

dc.format.extent407-414
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association (APA)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectdeliberate ignorance
dc.subjectuncertainty
dc.subjectemotion regulation
dc.subjectpositivity effect
dc.subjectaging
dc.titleAge differences in deliberate ignorance.
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/33914580
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume36
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalPsychology and Aging
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/pag0000603
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1498
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/pag0000603
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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