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dc.contributor.authorArokiasamy, Pen
dc.contributor.authorUttamacharya, Uen
dc.contributor.authorJain, Ken
dc.contributor.authorBiritwum, RBen
dc.contributor.authorYawson, AEen
dc.contributor.authorWu, Fen
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Yen
dc.contributor.authorMaximova, Ten
dc.contributor.authorEspinoza, BMen
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez, ASen
dc.contributor.authorAfshar, Sen
dc.contributor.authorPati, Sen
dc.contributor.authorIce, Gen
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Sen
dc.contributor.authorLiebert, MAen
dc.contributor.authorSnodgrass, JJen
dc.contributor.authorNaidoo, Nen
dc.contributor.authorChatterji, Sen
dc.contributor.authorKowal, Pen
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-12T09:27:29Z
dc.date.available2020-05-12T09:27:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15666
dc.description.abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic diseases contribute a large share of disease burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Chronic diseases have a tendency to occur simultaneously and where there are two or more such conditions, this is termed as 'multimorbidity'. Multimorbidity is associated with adverse health outcomes, but limited research has been undertaken in LMICs. Therefore, this study examines the prevalence and correlates of multimorbidity as well as the associations between multimorbidity and self-rated health, activities of daily living (ADLs), quality of life, and depression across six LMICs. METHODS: Data was obtained from the WHO's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave-1 (2007/10). This was a cross-sectional population based survey performed in LMICs, namely China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa, including 42,236 adults aged 18 years and older. Multimorbidity was measured as the simultaneous presence of two or more of eight chronic conditions including angina pectoris, arthritis, asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, stroke, and vision impairment. Associations with four health outcomes were examined, namely ADL limitation, self-rated health, depression, and a quality of life index. Random-intercept multilevel regression models were used on pooled data from the six countries. RESULTS: The prevalence of morbidity and multimorbidity was 54.2 % and 21.9 %, respectively, in the pooled sample of six countries. Russia had the highest prevalence of multimorbidity (34.7 %) whereas China had the lowest (20.3 %). The likelihood of multimorbidity was higher in older age groups and was lower in those with higher socioeconomic status. In the pooled sample, the prevalence of 1+ ADL limitation was 14 %, depression 5.7 %, self-rated poor health 11.6 %, and mean quality of life score was 54.4. Substantial cross-country variations were seen in the four health outcome measures. The prevalence of 1+ ADL limitation, poor self-rated health, and depression increased whereas quality of life declined markedly with an increase in number of diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight the challenge of multimorbidity in LMICs, particularly among the lower socioeconomic groups, and the pressing need for reorientation of health care resources considering the distribution of multimorbidity and its adverse effect on health outcomes.

en
dc.format.extent178 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectActivities of Daily Livingen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectChronic Diseaseen
dc.subjectComorbidityen
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subjectDepressionen
dc.subjectDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.titleThe impact of multimorbidity on adult physical and mental health in low- and middle-income countries: what does the study on global ageing and adult health (SAGE) reveal?en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26239481en
plymouth.volume13en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalBMC Meden
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12916-015-0402-8en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-06-17en
dc.identifier.eissn1741-7015en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/s12916-015-0402-8en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-08-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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