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dc.contributor.authorMileva, Men
dc.contributor.authorBurton, AMen
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-03T09:44:58Z
dc.date.available2020-04-03T09:44:58Z
dc.date.issued2018-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15491
dc.description.abstract

Unfamiliar face matching is a surprisingly difficult task, yet we often rely on people's matching decisions in applied settings (e.g., border control). Most attempts to improve accuracy (including training and image manipulation) have had very limited success. In a series of studies, we demonstrate that using smiling rather than neutral pairs of images brings about significant improvements in face matching accuracy. This is true for both match and mismatch trials, implying that the information provided through a smile helps us detect images of the same identity as well as distinguishing between images of different identities. Study 1 compares matching performance when images in the face pair display either an open-mouth smile or a neutral expression. In Study 2, we add an intermediate level, closed-mouth smile, to identify the effect of teeth being exposed, and Study 3 explores face matching accuracy when only information about the lower part of the face is available. Results demonstrate that an open-mouth smile changes the face in an idiosyncratic way which aids face matching decisions. Such findings have practical implications for matching in the applied context where we typically use neutral images to represent ourselves in official documents.

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dc.format.extent799 - 811en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectemotional expressionsen
dc.subjectface matchingen
dc.subjectface recognitionen
dc.subjectsmileen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectFacial Recognitionen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPhotic Stimulationen
dc.subjectSmilingen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titleSmiles in face matching: Idiosyncratic information revealed through a smile improves unfamiliar face matching performance.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29920996en
plymouth.issue4en
plymouth.volume109en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBr J Psycholen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjop.12318en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience MANUAL
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn2044-8295en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/bjop.12318en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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