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dc.contributor.authorCattani, Aen
dc.contributor.authorFloccia, Cen
dc.contributor.authorKidd, Een
dc.contributor.authorOnofrio, Den
dc.contributor.authorPettenati, Pen
dc.contributor.authorVolterra, Ven
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-12T15:23:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-09en
dc.identifier.issn0023-8333en
dc.identifier.other16452078en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/13454
dc.description.abstract

We report on an analysis of spontaneous gesture production in 2-year-old children who come from three countries (Italy, UK and Australia) and whom speak two languages (Italian and English), in an attempt to tease apart the influence of language and culture when comparing children from different cultural and linguistic environments. Eighty-seven monolingual children aged 24-30 months completed an experimental task measuring their comprehension and production of nouns and predicates. The Italian children scored significantly higher than the other groups on all lexical measures. With regards to gestures, British children produced significantly fewer pointing and speech combinations compared to the Italian and Australian children, who did not differ from each other. In contrast, Italian children produced significantly more representational gestures than the two other groups. We conclude that spoken language development is primarily influenced by the input language over gesture production, whereas the combination of cultural and language environments affects gesture productions.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.subjectPointing gestureen
dc.subjectRepresentational gestureen
dc.subjectLexiconen
dc.subjectCrossculturalen
dc.subjectCrosslinguisticen
dc.subjectLanguage developmenten
dc.titleGestures and words in naming: Evidence from cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisonen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.publisher-urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/lang.12346en
plymouth.journalLanguage Learningen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/lang.12346en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health: Medicine, Dentistry and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-02-15en
dc.rights.embargodate2020-05-01en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/lang.12346en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-09en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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