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dc.contributor.authorSchroff, Sen
dc.contributor.authorStreet, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-15T07:12:55Z
dc.date.available2018-10-15T07:12:55Z
dc.date.issued2018en
dc.identifier.issn1369-118Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/12515
dc.descriptionThis paper examines the implications for European music culture of the European Union’s (EU) Digital Single Market strategy. It focuses on the regulatory framework being created for the management of copyright policy, and in particular the role played by collective management organisations (CMOs or collecting societies). One of the many new opportunities created by digitalisation has been the music streaming services. These depend on consumers being able to access music wherever they are, but such a system runs counter to the management of rights on a national basis and through collecting organisations which act as monopolies within their own territories. The result has been ‘geo-blocking’. The EU has attempted to resolve this problem in a variety of ways, most recently in a Directive designed to reform the CMOs. In this paper, we document these various efforts, showing them to be motivated by a deep-seated and persisting belief in the capacity of ‘competition’ to resolve problems that, we argue, actually lie elsewhere – in copyright policy itself. The result is that the EU’s intervention fails to address its core concern and threatens the diversity of European music culture by rewarding those who are already commercially successful.en
dc.description.abstract

This paper examines the implications for European music culture of the European Union’s (EU) Digital Single Market strategy. It focuses on the regulatory framework being created for the management of copyright policy, and in particular the role played by collective management organisations (CMOs or collecting societies). One of the many new opportunities created by digitalisation has been the music streaming services. These depend on consumers being able to access music wherever they are, but such a system runs counter to the management of rights on a national basis and through collecting organisations which act as monopolies within their own territories. The result has been ‘geo-blocking’. The EU has attempted to resolve this problem in a variety of ways, most recently in a Directive designed to reform the CMOs. In this paper, we document these various efforts, showing them to be motivated by a deep-seated and persisting belief in the capacity of ‘competition’ to resolve problems that, we argue, actually lie elsewhere – in copyright policy itself. The result is that the EU’s intervention fails to address its core concern and threatens the diversity of European music culture by rewarding those who are already commercially successful.

en
dc.format.extent1305 - 1321en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
dc.titleThe politics of the Digital Single Market: culture vs. competition vs. copyrighten
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue10en
plymouth.volume21en
plymouth.journalInformation, Communication & Societyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1369118X.2017.1309445en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/School of Law, Criminology and Government
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA18 Law
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/1369118X.2017.1309445en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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