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dc.contributor.authorBonardi, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMondragón, Een
dc.contributor.authorBrilot, Ben
dc.contributor.authorJennings, DJen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-16T17:25:30Z
dc.date.available2018-02-16T17:25:30Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/10807
dc.description.abstract

Two experiments investigated the effect of the temporal distribution form of a stimulus on its ability to produce an overshadowing effect. The overshadowing stimuli were either of the same duration on every trial, or of a variable duration drawn from an exponential distribution with the same mean duration as that of the fixed stimulus. Both experiments provided evidence that a variable-duration stimulus was less effective than a fixed-duration cue at overshadowing conditioning to a target conditioned stimulus (CS); moreover, this effect was independent of whether the overshadowed CS was fixed or variable. The findings presented here are consistent with the idea that the strength of the association between CS and unconditioned stimulus (US) is, in part, determined by the temporal distribution form of the CS. These results are discussed in terms of time-accumulation and trial-based theories of conditioning and timing.

en
dc.format.extent523 - 542en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAssociative learningen
dc.subjectOvershadowingen
dc.subjectRatsen
dc.subjectStimulus distribution formen
dc.subjectTimingen
dc.subjectAcoustic Stimulationen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectAssociation Learningen
dc.subjectConditioning, Classicalen
dc.subjectCuesen
dc.subjectDiscrimination (Psychology)en
dc.subjectInhibition (Psychology)en
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPhotic Stimulationen
dc.subjectPsychological Theoryen
dc.subjectRatsen
dc.subjectRats, Long-Evansen
dc.subjectTime Factorsen
dc.subjectTime Perceptionen
dc.titleOvershadowing by fixed- and variable-duration stimuli.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203812en
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume68en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalQ J Exp Psychol (Hove)en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17470218.2014.960875en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dc.identifier.eissn1747-0226en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/17470218.2014.960875en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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