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dc.contributor.authorAshurst, EJen
dc.contributor.authorJones, RBen
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, GRen
dc.contributor.authorEmmens, Ten
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-10T09:33:31Z
dc.date.available2016-10-10T09:33:31Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-31en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/6491
dc.description.abstract

BACKGROUND: Professionals are interested in using e-health but implementation of new methods is slow. Barriers to implementation include the need for training and limited awareness or experience. Research may not always convince mental health professionals (MHPs). Adding the 'voice' of mental health service users (MHSUs) in collaborative learning may help. Involving MHSUs in face-face education can be difficult. We had previously been unable to engage MHPs in online discussion with MHSUs. Here we assessed the feasibility of short online courses involving MHSUs and MHPs. METHODS: We ran three e-health courses, comprising live interactive webcast, week's access to a discussion forum, and final live interactive webcast. We recruited MHPs via posters, newsletters, and telephone from a local NHS trust, and online via mailing lists and personal contacts from NHS trusts and higher education. We recruited MHSUs via a previous project and an independent user involvement service. Participants were presented with research evidence about e-health and asked to discuss topics using professional and lived experience. Feasibility was assessed through recruitment and attrition, participation, and researcher workloads. Outcomes of self-esteem and general self-efficacy (MHSUs), and Internet self-efficacy and confidence (MHPs) were piloted. RESULTS: Online recruiting was effective. We lost 15/41 from registration to follow-up but only 5/31 that participated in the course failed to complete follow-up. Nineteen MHPs and 12 MHSUs took part and engaged with each other in online discussion. Feedback was positive; three-quarters of MHPs indicated future plans to use the Internet for practice, and 80% of MHSUs felt the course should be continued. Running three courses for 31 participants took between 200 to 250 hours. Before and after outcome measures were completed by 26/31 that participated. MHP Internet self-efficacy and general Internet confidence, MHSU self-esteem and general self-efficacy, all seemed reliable and seemed to show some increase. CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative learning between MHSUs and MHPs in a structured online anonymous environment over a one-week course is feasible, may be more practical and less costly than face-face methods, and is worthy of further study.

en
dc.format.extent37 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectCooperative Behavioren
dc.subjectEducation, Medical, Continuingen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMental Disordersen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMental Health Servicesen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectPilot Projectsen
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen
dc.subjectSelf Concepten
dc.subjectSelf Efficacyen
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.subjectTherapy, Computer-Assisteden
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titleCollaborative learning about e-health for mental health professionals and service users in a structured anonymous online short course: pilot study.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22651553en
plymouth.volume12en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalBMC Med Educen
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6920-12-37en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-05-02en
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6920en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/1472-6920-12-37en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2012-05-31en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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