Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPezzulo, Gen
dc.contributor.authorBarsalou, LWen
dc.contributor.authorCangelosi, Aen
dc.contributor.authorFischer, MHen
dc.contributor.authorSpivey, Men
dc.contributor.authorMcRae, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T09:48:17Z
dc.date.available2013-10-15T09:48:17Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.issn1664-1078en
dc.identifier.other5en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/2204
dc.description.abstract

Embodied theories are increasingly challenging traditional views of cognition by arguing that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences, and processed at this sensorimotor level, rather than being represented and processed abstractly in an amodal conceptual system. Given the established empirical foundation, and the relatively underspecified theories to date, many researchers are extremely interested in embodied cognition but are clamouring for more mechanistic implementations. What is needed at this stage is a push toward explicit computational models that implement sensory-motor grounding as intrinsic to cognitive processes. In this article, six authors from varying backgrounds and approaches address issues concerning the construction of embodied computational models, and illustrate what they view as the critical current and next steps toward mechanistic theories of embodiment. The first part has the form of a dialogue between two fictional characters: Ernest, the �experimenter�, and Mary, the �computational modeller�. The dialogue consists of an interactive sequence of questions, requests for clarification, challenges, and (tentative) answers, and touches the most important aspects of grounded theories that should inform computational modeling and, conversely, the impact that computational modeling could have on embodied theories. The second part of the article discusses the most important open challenges for embodied computational modelling.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe Mechanics of Embodiment: A Dialogue on Embodiment and Computational Modelingen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.volume2en
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://www.frontiersin.org/cognition/10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00005/abstracten
plymouth.journalFrontiers in Psychologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00005en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Engineering, Computing and Mathematics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00005en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
plymouth.oa-locationhttp://www.frontiersin.org/Profile/PublicationDetails.aspx?ArtId=2155en


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV