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dc.contributor.authorHandy, RD
dc.contributor.authorClark, NJ
dc.contributor.authorHutt, LP
dc.contributor.authorBescós, R
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-01T16:00:56Z
dc.date.available2023-11-01T16:00:56Z
dc.date.issued2023-12
dc.identifier.issn2468-2020
dc.identifier.issn2468-2020
dc.identifier.other100428
dc.identifier.urihttps://pearl.plymouth.ac.uk/handle/10026.1/21511
dc.description.abstract

The effect of chemical pollution on the microbiomes of wildlife has been given little attention. A new concept is emerging where microbiomes are vital to host animal or plant health, and for ecosystems. Data are mainly on mammals, birds, and fish. Changing environmental conditions (e.g., salinity, pH, season) and exposure to chemicals alter the composition of gill, gut and skin microbiomes. Gut microbiomes are also modulated by diet, and exposure to chemicals including metals, nanomaterials, fungicides or microplastics. However, a change in the microbiome does not necessarily infer adverse effects on the host, with some evidence of co-adaptation. Environmental risk assessment for biocides and new nanomaterials should be revisited in context with microbiome-host interactions to better protect wildlife and ecosystems.

dc.format.extent100428-100428
dc.languageen
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.subjectEcotoxicology
dc.subjectAnimal health
dc.subjectNanomaterials
dc.subjectBiocides
dc.subjectGut flora
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.titleThe microbiomes of wildlife and chemical pollution: Status, knowledge gaps and challenges
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.volume36
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cotox.2023.100428
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalCurrent Opinion in Toxicology
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cotox.2023.100428
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Health|School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Science and Engineering|School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Research Groups|Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role|Academics
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|REF 2021 Researchers by UoA|UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
dcterms.dateAccepted2023-08-03
dc.date.updated2023-11-01T16:00:56Z
dc.rights.embargodate2023-11-3
dc.identifier.eissn2468-2020
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.cotox.2023.100428


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