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dc.contributor.authorFrancis-Wenger, H
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-15T08:04:22Z
dc.date.available2023-06-15T08:04:22Z
dc.date.issued2023-06-06
dc.identifier.issn1354-5752
dc.identifier.issn2047-8984
dc.identifier.urihttps://pearl.plymouth.ac.uk/handle/10026.1/20972
dc.description.abstract

Background Compassion fatigue can have detrimental effects on emergency nurses and the quality of patient care they deliver. Ongoing challenges such as operational pressures and the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have increased nurses’ risk of experiencing compassion fatigue.

Aim To explore and understand emergency nurses’ experiences and perceptions of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue.

Method This study used an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design comprising two phases. In phase one, the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL-5) scale was used to obtain information on the prevalence and severity of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue among emergency nurses. In phase two, six participants’ experiences and perceptions were explored via semi-structured interviews.

Findings A total of 44 emergency nurses completed the ProQOL-5 questionnaires. Six respondents had a high compassion satisfaction score, 38 had a moderate score and none had a low score. In the interviews, participants revealed different explanations regarding their compassion satisfaction levels. Three main themes were identified: personal reflections; factors identified as maintaining stability; and external factors affecting compassion.

Conclusion Compassion fatigue needs to be prevented and addressed systemically to avoid detrimental effects on ED staff morale and well-being, staff retention, patients and care delivery.

dc.format.extent19-26
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.publisherRCN Publishing Ltd.
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectburnout
dc.subjectcoronavirus
dc.subjectemergency care
dc.subjectmental health
dc.subjectoccupational health
dc.subjectoccupational stress
dc.subjectprofessional
dc.subjectstaff welfare
dc.subjectworkforce
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectCompassion Fatigue
dc.subjectBurnout, Professional
dc.subjectEmpathy
dc.subjectQuality of Life
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectJob Satisfaction
dc.subjectPersonal Satisfaction
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnaires
dc.subjectNurses
dc.titleExploring compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in emergency nurses: a mixed-methods study
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/37278088
plymouth.issue2
plymouth.volume32
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.7748/en.2023.e2164
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalEmergency Nurse
dc.identifier.doi10.7748/en.2023.e2164
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Faculty of Health|School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group|Plymouth|Users by role|Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2023-02-07
dc.date.updated2023-06-15T08:04:21Z
dc.rights.embargodate9999-12-31
dc.identifier.eissn2047-8984
dc.rights.embargoperiodforever
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.7748/en.2023.e2164


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