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dc.contributor.authorChiaravalloti, ND
dc.contributor.authorDeLuca, J
dc.contributor.authorSalter, A
dc.contributor.authorAmato, MP
dc.contributor.authorBrichetto, G
dc.contributor.authorChataway, J
dc.contributor.authorDalgas, U
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, R
dc.contributor.authorFeys, P
dc.contributor.authorFilippi, M
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, J
dc.contributor.authorInglese, M
dc.contributor.authorMeza, C
dc.contributor.authorMoore, NB
dc.contributor.authorMotl, RW
dc.contributor.authorRocca, MA
dc.contributor.authorSandroff, BM
dc.contributor.authorCutter, G
dc.contributor.authorFeinstein, A
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-08T13:21:20Z
dc.date.available2022-08-08T13:21:20Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-09
dc.identifier.issn1352-4585
dc.identifier.issn1477-0970
dc.identifier.otherARTN 13524585221088190
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/19516
dc.description.abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Objective:</jats:title><jats:p> Processing speed (PS) deficits are the most common cognitive deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS), followed by learning and memory deficits, and are often an early cognitive problem. It has been argued that impaired PS is a primary consequence of MS, which in turn decreases learning. The current analysis examined the association between PS and learning in a large cohort of individuals with progressive MS. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods:</jats:title><jats:p> Baseline data from a randomized clinical trial on rehabilitation taking place at 11 centers across North America and Europe were analyzed. Participants included 275 individuals with clinically definite progressive MS (primary, secondary) consented into the trial. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results:</jats:title><jats:p> Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) significantly correlated with California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) ( r = 0.21, p = 0.0003) and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test–Revised (BVMT-R) ( r = 0.516, p &lt; 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the SDMT z score to distinguish between impaired and non-impaired CVLT-II performance demonstrated an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.55–0.68) and a threshold of −1.62. ROC analysis between SDMT and BVMT-R resulted in an AUC of 0.77 (95% CI: 0.71–0.83) and threshold of −1.75 for the SDMT z score to predict impaired BVMT-R. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusion:</jats:title><jats:p> Results indicate little ability beyond chance to predict CVLT-II from SDMT (61%), albeit statistically significant. In contrast, there was a 77% chance that the model could distinguish between impaired and non-impaired BVMT-R. Several potential explanations are discussed. </jats:p></jats:sec>

dc.format.extent135245852210881-135245852210881
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.subjectProgressive multiple sclerosis
dc.subjectBICAMS
dc.subjectcognition
dc.subjectSDMT
dc.subjectprocessing speed
dc.subjectmemory
dc.titleThe relationship between processing speed and verbal and non-verbal new learning and memory in progressive multiple sclerosis
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35531965
plymouth.issue11
plymouth.volume28
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13524585221088190
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/13524585221088190
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Plymouth Institute of Health and Care Research (PIHR)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Researchers in ResearchFish submission
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-02-25
dc.rights.embargodate2022-8-10
dc.identifier.eissn1477-0970
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/13524585221088190
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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