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dc.contributor.authorHilmi, Nen
dc.contributor.authorChami, Ren
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, MDen
dc.contributor.authorHall-Spencer, JMen
dc.contributor.authorLebleu, Len
dc.contributor.authorBenitez, MBen
dc.contributor.authorLevin, LAen
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-20T15:17:08Z
dc.date.available2021-09-20T15:17:08Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-07en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17882
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>The potential for Blue Carbon ecosystems to combat climate change and provide co-benefits was discussed in the recent and influential Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate. In terms of Blue Carbon, the report mainly focused on coastal wetlands and did not address the socio-economic considerations of using natural ocean systems to reduce the risks of climate disruption. In this paper, we discuss Blue Carbon resources in coastal, open-ocean and deep-sea ecosystems and highlight the benefits of measures such as restoration and creation as well as conservation and protection in helping to unleash their potential for mitigating climate change risks. We also highlight the challenges—such as valuation and governance—to marshaling their mitigation role and discuss the need for policy action for natural capital market development, and for global coordination. Efforts to identify and resolve these challenges could both maintain and harness the potential for these natural ocean systems to store carbon and help fight climate change. Conserving, protecting, and restoring Blue Carbon ecosystems should become an integral part of mitigation and carbon stock conservation plans at the local, national and global levels.</jats:p>

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.titleThe Role of Blue Carbon in Climate Change Mitigation and Carbon Stock Conservationen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.volume3en
plymouth.journalFrontiers in Climateen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fclim.2021.710546en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-08-11en
dc.rights.embargodate2021-09-22en
dc.identifier.eissn2624-9553en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fclim.2021.710546en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2021-09-07en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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