Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCavan, EL
dc.contributor.authorBelcher, A
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, A
dc.contributor.authorHill, SL
dc.contributor.authorKawaguchi, S
dc.contributor.authorMcCormack, S
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, B
dc.contributor.authorNicol, S
dc.contributor.authorRatnarajah, L
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, K
dc.contributor.authorSteinberg, DK
dc.contributor.authorTarling, GA
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, PW
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T15:50:59Z
dc.date.issued2019-12
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.other4742
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/15826
dc.description.abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Antarctic krill (<jats:italic>Euphausia superba</jats:italic>) are swarming, oceanic crustaceans, up to two inches long, and best known as prey for whales and penguins – but they have another important role. With their large size, high biomass and daily vertical migrations they transport and transform essential nutrients, stimulate primary productivity and influence the carbon sink. Antarctic krill are also fished by the Southern Ocean’s largest fishery. Yet how krill fishing impacts nutrient fertilisation and the carbon sink in the Southern Ocean is poorly understood. Our synthesis shows fishery management should consider the influential biogeochemical role of both adult and larval Antarctic krill.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent4742-
dc.format.mediumElectronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectAntarctic Regions
dc.subjectBiomass
dc.subjectCarbon
dc.subjectCarbon Cycle
dc.subjectEuphausiacea
dc.subjectFood Chain
dc.subjectSeawater
dc.subjectSpheniscidae
dc.subjectWhales
dc.titleThe importance of Antarctic krill in biogeochemical cycles
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeReview
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31628346
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume10
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-12668-7
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalNature Communications
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-019-12668-7
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-09-25
dc.rights.embargodate2020-7-3
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/s41467-019-12668-7
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-12
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.funderProcesses Influencing Carbon Cycling: Observations of the Lower limb of the Antarctic Overturning (PICCOLO)::NERC


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
Atmire NV