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dc.contributor.authorCangelosi, A
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-24T10:03:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-11
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.issn1471-2970
dc.identifier.otherARTN 20180032
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/12413
dc.description.abstract

Trust is a critical issue in human-robot interactions: as robotic systems gain complexity, it becomes crucial for them to be able to blend in our society by maximizing their acceptability and reliability. Various studies have examined how trust is attributed by people to robots, but less have investigated the opposite scenario, where a robot is the trustor and a human is the trustee. The ability for an agent to evaluate the trustworthiness of its sources of information is particularly useful in joint task situations where people and robots must collaborate to reach shared goals. We propose an artificial cognitive architecture based on the developmental robotics paradigm that can estimate the trustworthiness of its human interactors for the purpose of decision making. This is accomplished using Theory of Mind (ToM), the psychological ability to assign to others beliefs and intentions that can differ from one’s owns. Our work is focused on an humanoid robot cognitive architecture that integrates a probabilistic ToM and trust model supported by an episodic memory system. We tested our architecture on an established developmental psychological experiment, achieving the same results obtained by children, thus demonstrating a new method to enhance the quality of human and robot collaborations. Keywords—trust, theory of mind, episodic memory, cognitive robotics, developmental robotics, human-robot interaction

dc.format.extent20180032-20180032
dc.format.mediumPrint
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoyal Society, The
dc.subjecttrust
dc.subjecttheory of mind
dc.subjectepisodic memory
dc.subjectcognitive robotics
dc.subjectdevelopmental robotics
dc.subjecthuman-robot interaction
dc.titleWould a Robot Trust You? Developmental Robotics Model of Trust and Theory of Mind
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30852993
plymouth.issue1771
plymouth.volume374
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0032
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalPhilosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rstb.2018.0032
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-07-30
dc.rights.embargodate2019-3-26
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2970
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rstb.2018.0032
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2019-03-11
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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