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dc.contributor.authorHughes, JGen
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Wen
dc.contributor.authorBreckons, Men
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Jen
dc.contributor.authorLloyd-Williams, Men
dc.contributor.authorMolassiotis, Aen
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-13T15:09:40Z
dc.date.available2018-08-13T15:09:40Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-08en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/12116
dc.description.abstract

BACKGROUND: Nested qualitative studies within clinical trials provide data on patients' experiences of receiving trial interventions and can inform and improve trial designs. The present study explored patients' experiences of participating in a randomised controlled trial of acupressure wristbands for chemotherapy related nausea. METHODS: A randomised three-group sham-controlled trial was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of acupressure wristbands in the management of chemotherapy-related nausea. A convenience sample of 26 patients volunteered to participate in a qualitative study to explore their experiences of using acupressure wristbands, and taking part in the clinical trial. Participants were recruited from each of the three UK geographical sites from which the trial was conducted: Manchester, Liverpool and Plymouth. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants in their own homes or other location convenient for participating patients. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework methodology. RESULTS: The main motivational factors influencing participants to take part in the trial were a desire to 'give something back' and limit their own experience of nausea. Participants were largely satisfied with the organisation and running of the acupressure wristband trial. Many participants experienced positive outcomes as a result of taking part in the trial. Lapses in memory, or poor health as a result of their chemotherapy treatment, led to some participants failing to complete trial paperwork on designated days. Two sham wristband participants reported wearing the bands inappropriately resulting in pressure being applied to the acupoint. Almost all of the participants interviewed had only experienced mild nausea or vomiting during the trial. Participants were pragmatic on the extent to which the wristbands were responsible for this lack of nausea and vomiting during the trial. However, many participants, including some patients receiving sham acupressure, believed the wristbands to have had a positive impact on their nausea and vomiting; there was a perception that the wristbands were, at least in part, responsible for the lack of nausea and vomiting they had experienced. CONCLUSIONS: Participants perceive acupressure wristbands as reducing the level of nausea and vomiting experienced during chemotherapy treatment. Reports that some participants wore wristbands inappropriately, and/or delayed completion of trial paperwork could represent confounding variables and have implications for the trial results, and the design of clinical trials within the field of cancer.

en
dc.format.extent260 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAcupressureen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectAntineoplastic Agentsen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMiddle Ageden
dc.subjectNauseaen
dc.subjectNeoplasmsen
dc.subjectVomitingen
dc.subjectWristen
dc.title"Until the trial is complete you can't really say whether it helped you or not, can you?": exploring cancer patients' perceptions of taking part in a trial of acupressure wristbands.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24103725en
plymouth.volume13en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalBMC Complement Altern Meden
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6882-13-260en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Professional Services staff
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Nursing and Midwifery
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-09-26en
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/1472-6882-13-260en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-10-08en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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