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The Plymouth Student Scientist

Document Type

Psychology Article

Abstract

Considering the prevalence of acquired brain injury (ABI) and the concerning statistics around the associated risk of problematic substance use, impacted mental health, and suicidality (3-4 greater risk of suicidality in those with TBI), and the lack of qualitative, recent, and UK based research. This study aimed to explore what people’s reasons for living after ABI were. Individuals living with ABI were recruited via BABICM (British Association of Brain Injury and Complex Case Management) to participate in semi-structured interviews. A mixed thematic analysis was conducted on the transcripts using the themes from Knight, Norman and Simpson (2020) as a framework for a deductive analysis and then a reflexive inductive thematic analysis was conducted. The participants (four British males) had experienced a TBI (average time since injury 26 years). Two overarching themes of Lost and maintained sense of self, and ABI is a hidden disability, and five main themes Acceptance, Support networks, Experiences of low mood and suicidality, Protective factors and coping strategies, and Overcoming challenges and posttraumatic growth were identified along with several subthemes. Suicidality was a comparatively minor theme and did not underlie all the other themes as in the Knight et al. paper. The themes that emerged were focused on factors that impact recovery and rehabilitation (positively and negatively), wellbeing and mental health more generally. The data might point toward suicidality in this population being reduced or prevented through a comprehensive package of support, long-term case management, acceptance, and various protective factors.

Publication Date

2022-12-23

Publication Title

The Plymouth Student Scientist

Volume

15

Issue

2

First Page

586

Last Page

614

ISSN

1754-2383

Deposit Date

December 2022

Embargo Period

2024-07-08

URI

http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/20104

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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