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The Plymouth Student Scientist

Abstract

Current literature is claiming for an important relationship between conscious experiencing and executive functions (mainly working memory). Since there is still a lack of empirical evidence relating those mental processes, the aim of this research is to continue exploring those relations by finding out how different components of working memory may affect the threshold to consciousness. The experiment contained three groups of people who performed two concurrent computerized tasks. The first one consisted of a replication of a priming and subjective visibility task (de Loof et al., 2013) for all the groups. Both experimental groups differed from the control group in the additional mental load due to the second task and differed between them in the nature of the load (remembering phonological or spatial information). Psychology students participated in the study facing the pc monitor to perform the first task alone if assigned to the control group, or concurrent to a Corsi Block-Tapping Test or a Phonological Maintenance Task if assigned to the experimental groups. The results seem to suggest that the spatial overload group had more trouble when trying to be conscious of the prime number in comparison to the other two. These results show accordance with previous research and could be the first to show a possible working memory module-dependence when it comes to conscious perception. This view could lead to new important reformulations of theories of consciousness and language.

Publication Date

2021-07-08

Publication Title

The Plymouth Student Scientist

Volume

14

Issue

1

First Page

583

Last Page

599

ISSN

1754-2383

Deposit Date

July 2021

Embargo Period

2024-07-08

URI

http://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/17320

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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