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Abstract

Europe has seen a national populist turn in recent years, a movement away from liberal elites and the rise of 'post-truth' politics. While populist parties may have passed the high point of their success, their politics has had a considerable impact on the mainstream, drawing traditional parties in populist directions. In this article, I consider the consequences of this for those of a liberal persuasion, who value openness and diversity and who are suspicious of those bringing simple solutions to complex problems. I reflect on the findings of a series of comparative education policy and pedagogy studies that I have conducted with colleagues in northern Europe over the past ten years, and in their light, make a number of suggestions for how education can defend liberalism while taking the concerns of national populists seriously.

DOI

10.18546/lre.18.1.03

Publication Date

2020-03-01

Publication Title

London Review of Education

Volume

18

Issue

1

First Page

35

Last Page

49

ISSN

1474-8460

Embargo Period

2020-07-18

Organisational Unit

Institute of Education

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