ORCID

Abstract

Background: Mental ill health among ambulance staff is widespread. Evidence suggests that, with the right support, employees experiencing mental ill health can continue to work, symptom severity can be reduced and suicide prevented. Aims: To investigate ambulance staff perceptions and experiences of organisational mental health support. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey investigated work-related stressful life events and their potential psychological impact. The survey also examined staff perceptions and experiences of organisational support and acceptability of a proposed wellbeing intervention offering mandatory time to talk at work. Findings: A total of 540 ambulance staff responded. The majority reported having experienced work-related stressful life events (n=444; 82%). Associated psychological symptoms appeared to persist for years. Perceptions about organisational support related to support uptake. Stigma, fear and embarrassment were reported as barriers to disclosure and help-seeking. Mandatory time to talk at work would be acceptable (n=400; 74%). Conclusion: The association between work-related stressful events and psychological symptoms underscores the need for interventions supported at an organisation level.

DOI

10.12968/jpar.2022.14.7.287

Publication Date

2022-05-11

Publication Title

Journal of Paramedic Practice

Volume

14

Issue

7

First Page

287

Last Page

296

ISSN

1759-1376

Embargo Period

2023-03-01

Organisational Unit

School of Nursing and Midwifery

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