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dc.contributor.authorMay, Jon
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Jackie
dc.contributor.authorKavanagh, D
dc.contributor.authorPenfound, L
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-18T15:30:07Z
dc.date.available2012-05-18T15:30:07Z
dc.date.issued2008-06
dc.identifier.issn0269-9931
dc.identifier.issn1464-0600
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/997
dc.description.abstract

The elaborated intrusion (EI) theory of desire (Kavanagh, Andrade, & May, 2005) attributes the motivational force of cravings to cognitive elaboration, including imagery, of apparently spontaneous thoughts that intrude into awareness. We report a questionnaire study in which respondents rated a craving for food or drink. Questionnaire items derived from EI theory formed a single factor alongside factors for anticipated reward/relief, resistance, and opportunity. In a multiple regression predicting strength of craving, the first three factors accounted for 36% of the variance. Opportunity did not enter the model. In a second study, the difference between individuals' strong and weak cravings to take part in a sporting activity was shown to be related to visual, auditory, and general imagery, and to anticipated reward or relief from engaging in the activity. Implications for treatment of craving-related disorders are discussed in the light of these results and of other research indicating that interference with imagery can reduce the strength of craving.

dc.format.extent633-650
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInforma UK Limited
dc.subjectBehavioral and Social Science
dc.titleImagery and strength of craving for eating, drinking, and playing sport
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000256887900004&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume22
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalCognition & Emotion
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02699930701446296
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - REF
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Admin Group - REF/REF Admin Group - FoH
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 REF peer reviewers
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plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
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dc.identifier.eissn1464-0600
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/02699930701446296
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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