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dc.contributor.authorSambrook, TDen
dc.contributor.authorGoslin, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-22T14:50:05Z
dc.date.available2017-09-22T14:50:05Z
dc.date.issued2014-08en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/9975
dc.description.abstract

Reinforcement learning models make use of reward prediction errors (RPEs), the difference between an expected and obtained reward. There is evidence that the brain computes RPEs, but an outstanding question is whether positive RPEs ("better than expected") and negative RPEs ("worse than expected") are represented in a single integrated system. An electrophysiological component, feedback related negativity, has been claimed to encode an RPE but its relative sensitivity to the utility of positive and negative RPEs remains unclear. This study explored the question by varying the utility of positive and negative RPEs in a design that controlled for other closely related properties of feedback and could distinguish utility from salience. It revealed a mediofrontal sensitivity to utility, for positive RPEs at 275-310ms and for negative RPEs at 310-390ms. These effects were preceded and succeeded by a response consistent with an unsigned prediction error, or "salience" coding.

en
dc.format.extent1 - 10en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectDopamineen
dc.subjectEvent-related potential (ERP)en
dc.subjectFeedback related negativity (FRN)en
dc.subjectReward prediction error (RPE)en
dc.subjectSaliencyen
dc.subjectUnsigned prediction erroren
dc.subjectAnticipation, Psychologicalen
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectElectroencephalographyen
dc.subjectEvoked Potentialsen
dc.subjectFeedback, Psychologicalen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectGamblingen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectNeuropsychological Testsen
dc.subjectReinforcement (Psychology)en
dc.titleMediofrontal event-related potentials in response to positive, negative and unsigned prediction errors.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24946315en
plymouth.volume61en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalNeuropsychologiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.06.004en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.publisher.placeEnglanden
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-06en
dc.identifier.eissn1873-3514en
dc.rights.embargoperiod12 monthsen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.06.004en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-08en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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