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dc.contributor.authorFloccia, Cen
dc.contributor.authorButler, Jen
dc.contributor.authorGirard, Fen
dc.contributor.authorGoslin, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T13:26:52Z
dc.date.available2017-09-18T13:26:52Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01en
dc.identifier.issn0165-0254en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/9958
dc.description.abstract

This study examines children's ability to detect accent-related information in connected speech. British English children aged 5 and 7 years old were asked to discriminate between their home accent from an Irish accent or a French accent in a sentence categorization task. Using a preliminary accent rating task with adult listeners, it was first verified that the level of accentedness was similar across the two unfamiliar accents. Results showed that whereas the younger children group behaved just above chance level in this task, the 7-year-old group could reliably distinguish between these variations of their own language, but were significantly better at detecting the foreign accent than the regional accent. These results extend and replicate a previous study (Girard, Floccia, & Goslin, 2008) in which it was found that 5-year-old French children could detect a foreign accent better than a regional accent. The factors underlying the relative lack of awareness for a regional accent as opposed to a foreign accent in childhood are discussed, especially the amount of exposure, the learnability of both types of accents, and a possible difference in the amount of vowels versus consonants variability, for which acoustic measures of vowel formants and plosives voice onset time are provided. © 2009 The International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development.

en
dc.format.extent366 - 375en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCategorization of regional and foreign accent in 5- to 7-year-old British childrenen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue4en
plymouth.volume33en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalInternational Journal of Behavioral Developmenten
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0165025409103871en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience/UoA04 REF peer reviewers
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plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
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plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
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dc.identifier.eissn1464-0651en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/0165025409103871en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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