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dc.contributor.authorConstantino, Cen
dc.contributor.authorComber, SDWen
dc.contributor.authorScrimshaw, MDen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T10:51:35Z
dc.date.available2017-08-11T10:51:35Z
dc.date.issued2017-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/9784
dc.description.abstract

The shift toward bioavailability-based standards for metals such as copper and zinc not only improves the ecological relevance of the standard but also introduces significant complexity into assessing compliance. This study examined differences in the copper and zinc complexation characteristics of effluents from a range of different sewage treatment works and in relation to so-called 'natural' samples. This information is essential to determine whether the inclusion of effluent-specific complexation characteristics within the regulatory framework could enhance the environmental relevance of compliance criteria. The data show that for copper, binding affinity was not greater than that measured for materials derived from the receiving water environment, with a mean log K of between 4.4 and 5.15 and mean complexation capacity ranging from 38 to 120 μg/mg dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for effluents compared with a log K of 5.6 and complexation capacity of 37 μg/mg DOC for the Suwannee River fulvic acid. For zinc, however, effluents exhibited a much higher complexation capacity, with effluent means ranging from 3 to 23 μg/mg DOC compared with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, for which the complexation capacity could not be determined. Synthetic ligands in sewage effluent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), are implicated as contributing to these observed differences. This suggests that the current biotic ligand models for zinc might overstate the risk of harm in effluent-impacted waters. The data also show that the copper and zinc complexation characteristics of effluent samples obtained from the same sewage treatment works were less different from one another than those of effluents from other treatment works and therefore that sewage source has an important influence on complexation characteristics. The findings from this study support the case that the contribution to complexation from effluent-derived ligands could enhance the environmental relevance of bioavailability-based compliance criteria, in particular for zinc, owing to the additional complexation capacity afforded by effluent-derived ligands.

en
dc.format.extent8363 - 8374en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectBiotic ligand modelen
dc.subjectComplexationen
dc.subjectCopperen
dc.subjectMetal speciationen
dc.subjectSewage effluenten
dc.subjectZincen
dc.subjectBenzopyransen
dc.subjectCopperen
dc.subjectLigandsen
dc.subjectSewageen
dc.subjectWaste Wateren
dc.subjectWater Purificationen
dc.subjectZincen
dc.titleThe effect of wastewater effluent derived ligands on copper and zinc complexation.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28176154en
plymouth.issue9en
plymouth.volume24en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalEnviron Sci Pollut Res Inten
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11356-016-8332-3en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/BEACh
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-25en
dc.identifier.eissn1614-7499en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargoen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s11356-016-8332-3en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
plymouth.oa-locationhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11356-016-8332-3en


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