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dc.contributor.authorBraboszcz, C
dc.contributor.authorCahn, BR
dc.contributor.authorLevy, J
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, M
dc.contributor.authorDelorme, A
dc.contributor.editorNajbauer J
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T11:20:45Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T11:20:45Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherARTN e0170647
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/9724
dc.description.abstract

Despite decades of research, effects of different types of meditation on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity are still being defined. We compared practitioners of three different meditation traditions (Vipassana, Himalayan Yoga and Isha Shoonya) with a control group during a meditative and instructed mind-wandering (IMW) block. All meditators showed higher parieto-occipital 60-110 Hz gamma amplitude than control subjects as a trait effect observed during meditation and when considering meditation and IMW periods together. Moreover, this gamma power was positively correlated with participants meditation experience. Independent component analysis was used to show that gamma activity did not originate in eye or muscle artifacts. In addition, we observed higher 7-11 Hz alpha activity in the Vipassana group compared to all the other groups during both meditation and instructed mind wandering and lower 10-11 Hz activity in the Himalayan yoga group during meditation only. We showed that meditation practice is correlated to changes in the EEG gamma frequency range that are common to a variety of meditation practices.

dc.format.extente0170647-e0170647
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAlpha Rhythm
dc.subjectArtifacts
dc.subjectAttention
dc.subjectAwareness
dc.subjectCerebral Cortex
dc.subjectEye Movements
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectGamma Rhythm
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectIndia
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMeditation
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectMuscle Contraction
dc.subjectPsychometrics
dc.subjectRespiration
dc.subjectSensation
dc.subjectSignal Processing, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectSpectrum Analysis
dc.subjectYoga
dc.titleIncreased Gamma Brainwave Amplitude Compared to Control in Three Different Meditation Traditions
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28118405
plymouth.issue1
plymouth.volume12
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0170647
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalPLOS ONE
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0170647
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-22
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargo
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0170647
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.oa-locationhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0170647


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