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dc.contributor.authorDubey, Ren
dc.contributor.authorGunasekaran, Aen
dc.contributor.authorChilde, SJen
dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Ten
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-09T21:04:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0025-1747en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/9210
dc.description.abstract

Purpose: A shortage of skills is recognized as a major source of risk in supply chain networks. This study uses two independent organizational theories to explain how to build applicable skills for continuous availability of appropriate supply chain talents. The paper proposes an integrated framework that links human agency theory, social capital theory and supply chain skill. Design/methodology/approach: This framework is analyzed in Third Party Logistics (3PL) organizations by confirmatory factor analysis and tested using a survey. After pre-testing by six academics and six practitioners, and following the total design method, the data were collected from 183 3PL organizations in India. Data was checked to ensure no non-response bias. Research hypotheses were tested using WarpPLS-Structural Equation Modeling. Findings: Primary finding offers guidance to 3PL managers. Their driving role and mediating role of access to information and access to resources facilitate building supply chain skill. Leaders who invest in library, acquiring e-resources, offer financial support and create trust among employees are enablers of building supply chain skill. Research limitations/implications: Practical implications: Originality/value: This study classified fourteen supply chain skill into three categories as: managerial skill, quantitative skill and supply chain core skill. The study could be extended to similar companies in other developing countries.

en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.titleSkills needed in supply chain - human agency and social capital analysis in third party logisticsen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue1en
plymouth.volume56en
plymouth.publication-statusAccepteden
plymouth.journalManagement Decisionen
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/MD-04-2017-0428en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Business School
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA17 Business and Management Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-09en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1108/MD-04-2017-0428en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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