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dc.contributor.authorCelis-Plá, PSM
dc.contributor.authorMartínez, B
dc.contributor.authorKorbee, N
dc.contributor.authorHall-Spencer, JM
dc.contributor.authorFigueroa, FL
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T14:54:59Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-24T14:58:25Z
dc.date.available2017-03-24T14:54:59Z
dc.date.available2017-03-24T14:58:25Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-17
dc.identifier.issn0165-0009
dc.identifier.issn1573-1480
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/8682
dc.description.abstract

Ocean acidification increases the amount of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) available in seawater which can benefit photosynthesis in those algae that are currently carbon limited, leading to shifts in the structure and function of seaweed communities. Recent studies have shown that ocean acidification-driven shifts in seaweed community dominance will depend on interactions with other factors such as light and nutrients. The study of interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming can help elucidate the likely effects of climate change on marine primary producers. In this study, we investigated the ecophysiological responses of Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss. This large brown macroalga plays an important structural role in coastal Mediterranean communities. Algae were collected from both oligotrophic and ultraoligotrophic waters in southern Spain. They were then incubated in tanks at ambient (ca. 400–500 ppm) and high CO2 (ca. 1200–1300 ppm), and at 20 °C (ambient temperature) and 24 °C (ambient temperature +4 °C). Increased CO2 levels benefited the algae from both origins. Biomass increased in elevated CO2 treatments and was similar in algae from both origins. The maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax), used to estimate photosynthetic capacity, increased in ambient temperature/high CO2 treatments. The highest polyphenol content and antioxidant activity were observed in ambient temperature/high CO2 conditions in algae from both origins; phenol content was higher in algae from ultraoligotrophic waters (1.5–3.0%) than that from oligotrophic waters (1.0–2.2%). Our study shows that ongoing ocean acidification can be expected to increase algal productivity (ETRmax), boost antioxidant activity (EC50), and increase production of photoprotective phenols. Cystoseira tamariscifolia collected from oligotrophic and ultraoligotrophic waters were able to benefit from increases in DIC at ambient temperatures. Warming, not acidification, may be the key stressor for this habitat as CO2levels continue to rise.

dc.format.extent67-81
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/8680
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/8680
dc.subject3708 Oceanography
dc.subject31 Biological Sciences
dc.subject3103 Ecology
dc.subject37 Earth Sciences
dc.subject3108 Plant Biology
dc.subject14 Life Below Water
dc.subject13 Climate Action
dc.titleEcophysiological responses to elevated CO2 and temperature in Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Phaeophyceae)
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000400095700006&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue1-2
plymouth.volume142
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-017-1943-y
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalClimatic Change
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10584-017-1943-y
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/PRIMaRE Publications
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-06
dc.rights.embargodate2018-3-17
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1480
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10584-017-1943-y
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-17
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.oa-locationhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-017-1943-y


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