Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPuschendorf, R
dc.contributor.authorTodd, EV
dc.contributor.authorGardner, MG
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-23T09:12:22Z
dc.date.available2017-03-23T09:12:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-22
dc.identifier.issn0004-959X
dc.identifier.issn1446-5698
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/8673
dc.description.abstract

Litoria nannotis is an endangered waterfall frog from the wet tropics region in north Queensland that has suffered significant population declines due to the emerging fungal disease known as chytridiomycosis. The species has two deeply divergent lineages, and we used 454 shotgun sequencing of DNA extracted from one individual of the northern lineage to identify and design PCR primers for 576 microsatellite loci. Thirty markers were tested for amplification success and variability in a population sample from each lineage. Of these, 17 were found to be polymorphic in the northern lineage and 10 loci were polymorphic in the southern lineage. Numbers of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14 (mean = 6.47, s.d. = 4.02) for the northern lineage (17 polymorphic loci), and from 2 to 8 (mean = 5.40, s.d. = 2.55) in the southern lineage (10 polymorphic loci). Levels of heterozygosity were high in both lineages (northern meanHE = 0.63, s.d. = 0.21, range = 0.27–0.89; southern mean HE = 0.57, s.d. = 0.25, range = 0.18–0.81). These loci will be useful in understanding the genetic variation and connectivity amongst populations of this species recovering from mass population declines due to disease.

dc.format.extent390-390
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.subject454 GSFLX
dc.subjectpopulation declines
dc.subjectshotgun sequencing
dc.titleCharacterisation of microsatellites for Litoria nannotis (Amphibia : Hylidae), an endangered waterfall frog endemic to the Australian Wet Tropics
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.webofscience.com/api/gateway?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000400824600003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=11bb513d99f797142bcfeffcc58ea008
plymouth.issue6
plymouth.volume64
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1071/zo16072
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalAustralian Journal of Zoology
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/zo16072
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA06 Agriculture, Veterinary and Food Science
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-09
dc.identifier.eissn1446-5698
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.funderAustralian Research Council
rioxxterms.identifier.projectEnvironmental determinants of mass extinctions by emerging disease: why does chytridiomycosis exterminate frogs in rainforest but not in open forest? The emerging fungal disease known as chytridiomycosis is causing decline and extinctions of many species of frogs around the world; Australia is no exception
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1071/zo16072
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-22
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
plymouth.funderEnvironmental determinants of mass extinctions by emerging disease: why does chytridiomycosis exterminate frogs in rainforest but not in open forest? The emerging fungal disease known as chytridiomycosis is causing decline and extinctions of many species of frogs around the world; Australia is no exception::Australian Research Council


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
Atmire NV