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dc.contributor.authorGébelin, A
dc.contributor.authorMulch, A
dc.contributor.authorTeyssier, C
dc.contributor.authorJessup, MJ
dc.contributor.authorLaw, RD
dc.contributor.authorBrunel, M
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-14T15:20:07Z
dc.date.available2017-03-14T15:20:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.issn0091-7613
dc.identifier.issn1943-2682
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/8620
dc.description.abstract

The Neogene elevation history of the Mount Everest region is key for understanding the tectonic history of the world's highest mountain range, the evolution of the Tibetan Plateau, and climate patterns in East and Central Asia. In the absence of fossil surface deposits such as paleosols, volcanic ashes, or lake sediments, we conducted stable isotope paleoaltimetry based on the hydrogen isotope ratios (δ D) of hydrous minerals that were deformed in the South Tibetan detachment shear zone during the late Early Miocene. These minerals exchanged isotopically at high temperature with meteoric water (δ D water = 156% ± 5%) that originated as high-elevation precipitation and infi ltrated the crustal hydrologic system at the time of detachment activity. When compared to age-equivalent near-sea-level foreland oxygen isotope (δ 18O) paleosol records (δ 18Owater = 5.8% ± 1.0%), the difference in δ18Owater is consistent with mean elevations of ≥5000 m for the Mount Everest area. Mean elevations similar to modern suggest that an early Himalayan rain shadow may have infl uenced the late Early Miocene climatic and rainfall history to the north of the Himalayan chain. © 2013 Geological Society of America.

dc.format.extent799-802
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGeological Society of America
dc.subject37 Earth Sciences
dc.subject3709 Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
dc.subject3702 Climate Change Science
dc.subject3705 Geology
dc.subject13 Climate Action
dc.titleThe Miocene elevation of Mount Everest
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue7
plymouth.volume41
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1130/g34331.1
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalGeology
dc.identifier.doi10.1130/g34331.1
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA07 Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences
dc.identifier.eissn1943-2682
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1130/g34331.1
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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