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dc.contributor.authorPratt, NM
dc.contributor.authorKelly, P
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T23:49:26Z
dc.date.available2017-01-06T23:49:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-01
dc.identifier.issn1745-4999
dc.identifier.issn1745-4999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/8219
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>This paper uses a comparative methodology to examine the teaching of abstraction in two mathematics lessons, in Denmark and England. In doing so it aims to extend previous work by the authors, examining the effect of local, cultural issues on the form of teaching in order to understand how these also affect the subject content too. The analysis draws on two theoretical frameworks: the work of Hazzan and Zazkis to make sense of mathematical abstraction; and of Bernstein to provide a framework for examining pedagogic discourses at classroom level. The work compares two lessons, one each in England and Denmark, drawing out the ways in which teachers’ situated activities help to construct different versions of the subject matter – mathematical abstraction in this case. We assert that as well as abstraction being a practice which is constructed socially, cultural practices also mean that this is done differentially for, and by, groups of pupils and their teachers in ways which are likely to exacerbate the former’s differences, not reduce them. Some implications of this insight are discussed at the close.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent434-448
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.subjectComparative methodology
dc.subjectmathematical abstraction
dc.subjectBernstein
dc.subjectsubject knowledge
dc.titleThe cultural construction of subject discipline knowledge: comparing ‘abstraction’ in two international contexts
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.issue4
plymouth.volume11
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalResearch in Comparative and International Education
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1745499916682660
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Business/Plymouth Institute of Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA23 Education
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-30
dc.identifier.eissn1745-4999
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargo
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/1745499916682660
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-12-01
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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