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dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, G
dc.contributor.authorMyers, CE
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, RO
dc.contributor.authorMcLaren, RP
dc.contributor.authorGluck, MA
dc.contributor.authorWills, AJ
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-08T16:47:26Z
dc.date.available2016-08-08T16:47:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.issn0894-4105
dc.identifier.issn1931-1559
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/5227
dc.description.abstract

OBJECTIVE: Generalization is the application of existing knowledge to novel situations. Questions remain about the precise role of the hippocampus in this facet of learning, but a connectionist model by Gluck and Myers (1993) predicts that generalization should be enhanced following hippocampal damage. METHOD: In a two-category learning task, a group of amnesic patients (n = 9) learned the training items to a similar level of accuracy as matched controls (n = 9). Both groups then classified new items at various levels of distortion. RESULTS: The amnesic group showed significantly more accurate generalization to high-distortion novel items, a difference also present compared to a larger group of unmatched controls (n = 33). CONCLUSIONS: The model prediction of a broadening of generalization gradients in amnesia, at least for items near category boundaries, was supported by the results. Our study shows for the first time that amnesia can sometimes improve generalization. (PsycINFO Database Record

dc.format.extent915-919
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.subjectcategorical learning
dc.subjectstimulus generalization
dc.subjectgradient
dc.subjecthippocampus
dc.subjectlesion
dc.titleAmnesic Patients Show Superior Generalization in Category Learning
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27442451
plymouth.issue8
plymouth.volume30
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/neu0000301
plymouth.publication-statusPublished online
plymouth.journalNeuropsychology
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/neu0000301
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dc.publisher.placeUnited States
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-05-25
dc.identifier.eissn1931-1559
dc.rights.embargoperiodNo embargo
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/neu0000301
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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