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dc.contributor.authorMarsden, JF
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-30T08:18:45Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-21
dc.identifier.issn0012-1622
dc.identifier.issn1469-8749
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4991
dc.description.abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Aim</jats:title><jats:p>To examine intra‐ and interrater reliability/agreement, and time taken to score, when the Quality Function Measure (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">QFM</jats:styled-content>) is applied to children with hyperkinetic movement disorders (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">HMD</jats:styled-content>; e.g. dystonia, chorea, athetosis, tremor, and myoclonus).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Method</jats:title><jats:p>Fifteen ambulant children with <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">HMD</jats:styled-content> participated (eight males, seven females; mean age 13y 7mo, <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">SD</jats:styled-content> 3y 7mo). Three trained raters (two physiotherapists, one occupational therapist) independently scored the <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">QFM</jats:styled-content> using videos of each child performing Gross Motor Function Measure (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">GMFM</jats:styled-content>) Stand and Walk/Run/Jump dimensions. Reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">ICC</jats:styled-content>) model 2.1, Standard Error of Measurement (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">SEM</jats:styled-content>), and Bland–Altman methods.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Rater reliability was excellent for all five <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">QFM</jats:styled-content> attributes: intrarater <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">ICC</jats:styled-content>s ≥0.98 (95% confidence interval [<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">CI</jats:styled-content>] 0.83–1.00), and interrater <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">ICC</jats:styled-content>s ≥0.96 (95% <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">CI</jats:styled-content> 0.91–1.00). <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">SEM</jats:styled-content> varied from 2.07% to 4.72% points for intra‐ and interrater scores across <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">QFM</jats:styled-content> attributes. Bland–Altman tests demonstrated close agreement between ratings, with absolute mean differences varying from 0.34% to 3.23% (intrarater) to 1.67% to 3.82% (interrater). Median scoring duration time was 83 minutes (range 56–144min, <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">SD</jats:styled-content> 16.02).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Interpretation</jats:title><jats:p>Low measurement error attributable to rater effects suggests the <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">QFM</jats:styled-content> has potential as an evaluative measure in research studies involving children with <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">HMD</jats:styled-content>, though its lengthy scoring requirements are an important consideration for clinical practice. Evaluation of test–retest reliability and responsiveness is required.</jats:p></jats:sec>

dc.format.extent822-828
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectDependent Ambulation
dc.subjectDisability Evaluation
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectHyperkinesis
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Index
dc.titleRater reliability and scoring duration of the Quality Function Measure in ambulant children with hyperkinetic movement disorders
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.typeResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26888551
plymouth.issue8
plymouth.volume58
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/dmcn.13081
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health/School of Health Professions
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA03 Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/FoH - Applied Parkinson's Research
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Institute of Health and Community
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Users by role/Academics
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-15
dc.rights.embargodate2017-2-21
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8749
dc.rights.embargoperiod12 months
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/dmcn.13081
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-02-21
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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