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dc.contributor.authorAdams, SVen
dc.contributor.authorHarris, CMen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T12:04:05Z
dc.date.available2016-06-02T12:04:05Z
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4799
dc.description.abstract

Self-organizing artificial neural networks are a popular tool for studying visual system development, in particular the cortical feature maps present in real systems that represent properties such as ocular dominance (OD), orientation-selectivity (OR) and direction selectivity (DS). They are also potentially useful in artificial systems, for example robotics, where the ability to extract and learn features from the environment in an unsupervised way is important. In this computational study we explore a DS map that is already latent in a simple artificial network. This latent selectivity arises purely from the cortical architecture without any explicit coding for DS and prior to any self-organising process facilitated by spontaneous activity or training. We find DS maps with local patchy regions that exhibit features similar to maps derived experimentally and from previous modeling studies. We explore the consequences of changes to the afferent and lateral connectivity to establish the key features of this proto-architecture that support DS.

en
dc.format.extente102908 - ?en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAction Potentialsen
dc.subjectComputer Simulationen
dc.subjectDominance, Ocularen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectModels, Neurologicalen
dc.subjectNeural Networks (Computer)en
dc.subjectNeuronsen
dc.subjectOrientationen
dc.subjectVisual Cortexen
dc.titleA proto-architecture for innate directionally selective visual maps.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25054209en
plymouth.issue7en
plymouth.volume9en
plymouth.publication-statusPublished onlineen
plymouth.journalPLoS Oneen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0102908en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA11 Computer Science and Informatics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Brain
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-06-25en
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0102908en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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