Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBailey, Ien
dc.contributor.authorCaprotti, Fen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-12T12:26:02Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-12T12:40:16Z
dc.date.available2016-04-12T12:26:02Z
dc.date.available2016-04-12T12:40:16Z
dc.date.issued2014-01-01en
dc.identifier.issn0308-518Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4488
dc.description.abstract

The green economy is a highly complex construct in terms of its attempts to integrate economic, environmental, and social concerns, the wide range of actors involved, its material outcomes, and the forms of governance needed to regulate processes of economic greening. As such, it poses new empirical and theoretical challenges for social science research on socioenvironmental futures. This paper has two main aims. The first is to survey the emergent features and functional domains of the green economy. The second is to consider theoretical tools that might be used to analyse the drivers and processes shaping the green economy. Focusing on literature on sociotechnical transitions, ecological modernisation, the 'green' cultural economy, and postpolitical governance, we argue that understanding the functional and spatial heterogeneity of the green economy necessitates a multitheoretical approach. We then explore how combining branches of research on socioenvironmental governance can lead to theoretically and ontologically richer insights into the drivers, practices, and power relations within the green economy. In so doing, we respond to calls for socioeconomic research on environmental change which is neither just empirical nor bound to one theoretical outlook to the detriment of understanding the complexity of socioenvironmental governance and human-nature relations. © 2014 Pion and its Licensors.

en
dc.format.extent1797 - 1813en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/4486
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/4486
dc.titleThe green economy: Functional domains and theoretical directions of enquiryen
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue8en
plymouth.volume46en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalEnvironment and Planning Aen
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/a130102pen
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA14 Geography and Environmental Studies
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Research in Environment and Society (CeRES)
dc.identifier.eissn1472-3409en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1068/a130102pen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV