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dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Len
dc.contributor.authorWimmer, MCen
dc.contributor.authorHollins, TJen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-09T14:39:09Z
dc.date.available2015-12-09T14:39:09Z
dc.date.issued2015-03en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3894
dc.description.abstract

According to dual-process theories, recollection (slow and associated with contextual details) and familiarity (fast and automatic) are two independent processes underlying recognition memory. An adapted version of the process dissociation paradigm was used to measure recognition memory in 5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds and adults. In Experiment 1, it was found that 5-year-olds already recollect details of items (i.e., number). Recollection increased particularly between 5 and 7 years. Familiarity differed between 5 years and adulthood. In Experiment 2, under limited response time during retrieval, recollection was eliminated in 5-year-olds and reduced across all ages, whereas familiarity was left unaffected. Together, these findings are consistent with dual-process theories of recognition memory and provide support for two processes underlying recognition memory from a developmental perspective.

en
dc.format.extent120 - 134en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectDual-process theoryen
dc.subjectFamiliarityen
dc.subjectProcess dissociationen
dc.subjectRecognition memoryen
dc.subjectRecollectionen
dc.subjectSource monitoringen
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectAge Factorsen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMental Processesen
dc.subjectMental Recallen
dc.subjectPattern Recognition, Visualen
dc.subjectReaction Timeen
dc.subjectRecognition (Psychology)en
dc.subjectTask Performance and Analysisen
dc.subjectYoung Adulten
dc.titleProcess dissociation of familiarity and recollection in children: response deadline affects recollection but not familiarity.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25544395en
plymouth.volume131en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalJ Exp Child Psycholen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jecp.2014.11.003en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Cognition
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-11-15en
dc.identifier.eissn1096-0457en
dc.rights.embargoperiod12 monthsen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jecp.2014.11.003en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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