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dc.contributor.authorMemmott, Ren
dc.contributor.authorBriffa, Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-21T12:41:37Z
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-21T13:50:03Z
dc.date.available2015-10-21T12:41:37Z
dc.date.available2015-10-21T13:50:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3691
dc.description.abstract

Signals of individual quality are assumed to be difficult to exaggerate, either because they are directly linked to underlying traits (indices) or because they are costly to perform (handicaps). In practise advertisement displays may consist of conventional and costly components, for instance where a morphological structure related to body size is used in visual displays. In this case, there is the potential for dishonest displays, due to the population level variance around the relationship between body size and display structures. We examine the use of wing flicking displays that we observed in situ in a strandline dwelling seaweed fly Fucellia tergina, using overall body size and the size of their eyes as underlying indicators of condition. Males displayed far more frequently than females, and were also observed to frequently mount other flies, a behaviour that was rare in females. The rate of display was greater for males that had positive residual values from relationships between wing length and body length. In other words those males with larger than expected wings for their underlying quality displayed more frequently, indicating that these displays are open to exaggeration. Males with larger than expected wings (for the size of their body or eyes), however, mounted less frequently. We suggest that small bodied males are less successful in terms of mounting, but that those small males with relatively large wings may attempt to compensate for this through increased display effort.

en
dc.format.extent73 - 79en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3682
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/3682
dc.subjectDipteraen
dc.subjectDisplayen
dc.subjectHandicapen
dc.subjectHonestyen
dc.subjectSeaweed-flyen
dc.subjectSignalen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBody Sizeen
dc.subjectDipteraen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectPhenotypeen
dc.subjectSelection, Geneticen
dc.subjectSex Characteristicsen
dc.subjectSexual Behavior, Animalen
dc.subjectWings, Animalen
dc.titleExaggerated displays do not improve mounting success in male seaweed flies Fucellia tergina (Diptera: Anthomyiidae).en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26365923en
plymouth.volume120en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBehav Processesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.beproc.2015.09.004en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Marine Institute
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-09-07en
dc.identifier.eissn1872-8308en
dc.rights.embargoperiod12 monthsen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.beproc.2015.09.004en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/under-embargo-all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-11en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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