Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBacon, AMen
dc.contributor.authorBurak, Hen
dc.contributor.authorRann, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-25T16:47:25Z
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T09:53:18Z
dc.date.available2014-09-25T16:47:25Z
dc.date.available2014-12-10T09:53:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-27en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3175
dc.description.abstract

Levels of sensation seeking peak in adolescence and there is a well-documented association with delinquency and other risk taking behaviours. The present study investigated the potential moderating effect of trait Emotional Intelligence (EI) on this relationship. Trait EI encompasses high levels of empathy and emotion regulation and is associated with positive outcomes and wellbeing. 96 young adults (48 female; overall Mage = 19.76) completed measures of sensation seeking, trait EI and self-reported delinquent behaviours since age 12. Results indicated that sensation seeking and frequency of delinquent behaviours were positively associated, but this effect was moderated by trait EI for male participants - those with lower trait EI showed a greater increase in delinquency in line with a rise in sensation seeking. No moderation effect was observed for females, and females with higher levels of trait EI reported more delinquent behaviours. The results are discussed in terms of the protective role of trait EI in supporting self-regulation and whether, for some females, high levels of EI might predispose to antisocial relational behaviours.

en
dc.format.extent673 - 683en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3125
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/3125
dc.titleSex differences in the relationship between sensation seeking, trait emotional intelligence and delinquent behaviouren
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.issue6en
plymouth.volume25en
plymouth.journalJournal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14789949.2014.943796en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)/Behaviour
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1080/14789949.2014.943796en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


All items in PEARL are protected by copyright law.
Author manuscripts deposited to comply with open access mandates are made available in accordance with publisher policies. Please cite only the published version using the details provided on the item record or document. In the absence of an open licence (e.g. Creative Commons), permissions for further reuse of content should be sought from the publisher or author.
Theme by 
@mire NV