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dc.contributor.authorBrilot, BOen
dc.contributor.authorAsher, Len
dc.contributor.authorFeenders, Gen
dc.contributor.authorBateson, Men
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-14T16:23:13Z
dc.date.available2014-05-14T16:23:13Z
dc.date.issued2009-11en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3020
dc.description.abstract

Stereotypies are repetitive, unvarying and goalless behaviour patterns that are often considered indicative of poor welfare in captive animals. Quantifying stereotypies can be difficult, particularly during the early stages of their development when behaviour is still flexible. We compared two methods for objectively quantifying the development of route-tracing stereotypies in caged starlings. We used Markov chains and T-pattern analysis (implemented by the software package, Theme) to identify patterns in the sequence of locations a bird occupied within its cage. Pattern metrics produced by both methods correlated with the frequency of established measures of stereotypic behaviour and abnormal behaviour patterns counted from video recordings, suggesting that both methods could be useful for identifying stereotypic individuals and quantifying stereotypic behaviour. We discuss the relative benefits and disadvantages of the two approaches.

en
dc.format.extent256 - 264en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.subjectAlgorithmsen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectBehavior, Animalen
dc.subjectDiscrimination Learningen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMarkov Chainsen
dc.subjectModels, Biologicalen
dc.subjectMotor Activityen
dc.subjectRegression Analysisen
dc.subjectStarlingsen
dc.subjectStereotyped Behavioren
dc.subjectVideo Recordingen
dc.titleQuantification of abnormal repetitive behaviour in captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19622388en
plymouth.issue3en
plymouth.volume82en
plymouth.publication-statusPublisheden
plymouth.journalBehav Processesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.beproc.2009.07.003en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering/School of Biological and Marine Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Research Groups/Centre for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (CBCB)
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-07-10en
dc.identifier.eissn1872-8308en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.beproc.2009.07.003en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2009-11en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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