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dc.contributor.authorBrilot, BO
dc.contributor.authorBateson, M
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-08T13:38:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-08T13:38:29Z
dc.date.issued2012-06-23
dc.identifier.issn1744-9561
dc.identifier.issn1744-957X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/3000
dc.description.abstract

<jats:p>The majority of bird taxa perform water bathing, but little is known about the adaptive value of this behaviour. If bathing is important for feather maintenance then birds that have not bathed should have poorer feather condition, compromised escape ability and therefore increased responsiveness to cues of predation. We conducted two experiments examining the behaviour of captive starlings responding to conspecific alarm calls. Birds that had no access to bathing water showed a decreased willingness to feed and increased their vigilance behaviour following an alarm call. We argue that birds denied access to bathing water interpreted an ambiguous cue of threat as requiring more caution than birds that had access, consistent with higher levels of anxiety. Our results support the provision of bathing water for captive birds as an important welfare measure.</jats:p>

dc.format.extent379-381
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherThe Royal Society
dc.subjectbathing
dc.subjectEuropean starling
dc.subjectSturnus vulgaris
dc.subjectthreat perception
dc.subjectanimal welfare
dc.titleWater bathing alters threat perception in starlings
dc.typejournal-article
dc.typeArticle
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22250131
plymouth.issue3
plymouth.volume8
plymouth.publisher-urlhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2011.1200
plymouth.publication-statusPublished
plymouth.journalBiology Letters
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsbl.2011.1200
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Science and Engineering
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
dc.publisher.placeEngland
dc.identifier.eissn1744-957X
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot known
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rsbl.2011.1200
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review


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