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dc.contributor.authorCattani, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBonifacio, Sen
dc.contributor.authorFertz, Men
dc.contributor.authorIverson, JMen
dc.contributor.authorZocconi, Een
dc.contributor.authorCaselli, MCen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-05T13:49:01Z
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-05T13:49:36Z
dc.date.available2013-12-05T13:49:01Z
dc.date.available2013-12-05T13:49:36Z
dc.date.issued2010-03en
dc.identifier.issn1368-2822en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/2845
dc.description.abstract

BACKGROUND: Research conducted on preterm children's linguistic skills has provided varying pictures, and the question of whether and to what extent preterm children are delayed in early language acquisition remains largely unresolved. AIMS: To examine communicative and linguistic development during the second year in a group of Italian children born prematurely using the 'Primo Vocabolario del Bambino' (PVB), the Italian version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory. The primary goal was to compare action/gesture production, word comprehension, and word production, and the relationship between these three domains in preterm children and to normative data obtained from a large sample of Italian children born at term. A second aim was to address the longstanding debate regarding the use of chronological versus corrected gestational age in the assessment of preterm children's abilities. METHODS & PROCEDURES: Parents of twelve preterm children completed the PVB questionnaire at five age points during the children's second year, and scores were compared with those from a normative sample of full-term children and those of 59 full-term children selected as a control group from the normative sample for the PVB. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: Preterm children exhibited a delay in all three aspects of communication and language. In particular, communicative-linguistic age tended to lag approximately 3 months behind chronological age when children were between the ages of 12 and 24 months. When chronological age was used, preterm children's percentile scores for all three components of communication and language fell within the lower limits of the normal range, while scores calculated using corrected age either fell at or above the 50th percentile. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: Findings suggest that despite the significant biological risk engendered by premature birth, early communicative and linguistic development appears to proceed in a relatively robust fashion among preterm children, with tight relations across communicative domains as in full-term children. Employing both chronological and corrected gestational age criteria in the evaluation of preterm children's abilities may provide important information about their progress in language acquisition. This may be especially important during the initial stages of communicative and linguistic development, inasmuch as comparisons of the two sets of scores may provide clinicians with a way to distinguish children who may be at risk for language problems from those who may be expected to progress normally.

en
dc.format.extent162 - 173en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.replaceshttp://hdl.handle.net/10026.1/2844
dc.relation.replaces10026.1/2844
dc.subjectBirth Weighten
dc.subjectChild Developmenten
dc.subjectChild Languageen
dc.subjectChild, Preschoolen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectComprehensionen
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectGesturesen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectInfanten
dc.subjectInfant, Newbornen
dc.subjectInfant, Prematureen
dc.subjectLanguage Developmenten
dc.subjectLanguage Development Disordersen
dc.subjectLinguisticsen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectNonverbal Communicationen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.titleCommunicative and linguistic development in preterm children: a longitudinal study from 12 to 24 months.en
dc.typeJournal Article
plymouth.author-urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22748029en
plymouth.issue2en
plymouth.volume45en
plymouth.journalInternational Journal of Language and Communication Disordersen
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/13682820902818870en
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/00 Groups by role/Academics
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/Faculty of Health and Human Sciences/School of Psychology
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA
plymouth.organisational-group/Plymouth/REF 2021 Researchers by UoA/UoA04 Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
dcterms.dateAccepted2009-02-11en
dc.identifier.eissn1460-6984en
dc.rights.embargoperiodNot knownen
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3109/13682820902818870en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2010-03en
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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